Because Christianity is bigger than Biblical manhood or Biblical womanhood

Karen D asked on A Travelogue of the Interior if there is a difference between complementarianism and patriarchy. Here is what I think:

IMO, there is a spectrum difference. I think 2 ideas are enough to qualify the holder as complementarian: Read the rest of this entry »

In a recent thread in a Facebook group, a woman in a position of church leadership grieved that she was called “in open rebellion against God’s word” by being a woman in a church leadership position.
To which Deborah Downs answered (with a quote she previously wrote on her blog:

“When we come down to the basics of the polarities, two truths remain. If I am called to the priesthood as a complementarian then I am extraordinary. If I am called to the priesthood as an egalitarian then I am ordinary. But in neither instance can I be construed as disobedient unless God has never and will never call a woman into leadership. But He has, and He does, therefore, I am either extraordinary or ordinary, but disobedient I am not.”

Dawn Wilson, also a female pastor, had an answer too. Once again, it points back to God and his calling, not what others think:

Those throwing this at you … to quote Sheldon … think they are having a BAZINGA moment .. as if they got you and now you have nothing to reply …. they have said the final all ending word.

Frustrating … yes … but not enough to go up on the ledge

My Scripture response to those who throw this statement at me is this …

1 Thessalonians 2:4 but just as we have been approved by God to be entrusted with the gospel, so we speak, not as pleasing to men but to God , who examines our hearts.

I throw the weight back on God and God’s approval of me and His examining of my heart motives. My BAZINGA right back at them!

Trigger warning: Sexual abuse of a teenager, and condoning of it

——————————

This is yet more evidence that the Christian church, at large, does not understand or care about abuse:

take downChristianity Today’s Leadership Journal published an article  by a convicted ex- youth pastor, who sexually abused a teenager when he was in a position of trust over her. The nature of this article is not “I am a criminal, who caused this girl a lot of pain, having a long-term effect on her views on trust, relationships, sex, self-esteem, God and spirituality. I also hurt my wife, and others who trusted me.” It is: “I stumbled into an affair. We both did wrong. Now things are bad for me” – with a lot of preaching in between.

Many writers are telling them why they should take down the post, but this far, they are taking down negative comments instead. Commenters on more than one source told me, since yesterday, that they have left comments on that entry – and their comments were taken down. One say comments went from 75 to 15 in a few minutes, at another stage more than 20 comments disappeared again… Read the rest of this entry »

Does it taste like mud?

Does it taste like mud?

Adam: Soil tastes sweet! How could you disagree with me when we read the soil is brown, and “brown” mean sweet?

Anita: “Brown” does not mean sweet. It is a color, not a taste.

Adam: But we read chocolate cake is brown, too. Do you deny that chocolate cakes are sweet?

Read the rest of this entry »

Purpose of experiment:

Many “Biblical womanhood” women, especially of the Quiverfull variety, claim that “feminists” neglect their children, while they love theirs. By this standard, attention to children is good (I agree) and neglecting them is bad. (I agree.) If their hypothesis holds out, the average child of a feminist mother would remember less personal attention from Mum than the average child of a biblical womanhood supporter. Read the rest of this entry »

I have said before that I have asked women, home schooling mothers who believe in men as “priests” and authority figures, what should be done if an authority figure molests your children. These patriarchy supporters were completely unwilling to say that children should be kept away from such molesters. They were so hung up not going against authority that they would seemingly rather allow a molester to continue than to risk speaking out – in an imperfect way – against one.

Of course I found that shocking. Jesus said that when you see someone hungry or in need and don’t help, what you failed to do for the least of these you failed to do for Him. He came to free the oppressed.

HowToMakeAnAppealPage10If you want proper evidence of patriarchy’s teachings on abuse and authority, Recovering Grace has a new article with a lot of diagrams and teachings, scanned straight from books of Gothard’s Advanced Training Institute, to prove that “patriarchy” really makes it impossible for the abused to get away in an approved manner.

Gothard, of course, had to recently step down because of sexual harrassment accusations himself. Imagine how many layers of authority figures a girl would have had to go through to “rightly” complain about him (without appealing to authorities too much or too little, as in the diagram from his material on the right of this page).

Jesus replied, “And you experts in the law, woe to you, because you load people down with burdens they can hardly carry, and you yourselves will not lift one finger to help them. – Luke 11:46

 

LifeMessagesPage33Excerpt

Gothard lessons: When children are molested by the father, the molestation needs to be discovered at least 4 times, after the first time with the mother appealing to him to stop, then his parents or in-laws, then the church. Only if he is discovered to be molesting again after all these appeals, could he be given over to the law…

 

I wish it wasn’t true. I already know from sites like A Cry for Justice that the church often gives terrible advice to abuse victims. I don’t want to believe Samantha Field is entirely right when claiming that purity culture(1) Christians don’t care about or teach the importance of consent. I’ve read stories of “Christian” leaders telling women to repent for being raped. I already mentioned some abuse-condoning statements by Paige Patterson and Bruce Ware on this blog.

But evidence keeps on mounting:

Dannah K. Gresh (also the writer of “And the Bride Wore White”, who has sold more than 470,000 books, leaders guides, and curriculum pulling-back-the-shadesbearing the message of purity) and Dr. Juli Slattery (a psychologist formerly from Focus on the Family) wrote a new book to give a Christian response to “50 Shades of Grey” and erotica like it, and talk about how to be sexual and spiritual at the same time. The topic of “Pulling Back the Shades: Erotica, Intimacy, and the Longings of a Woman’s Heart”certainly has merit. But their book also gives evidence of followers of Jesus not caring or thinking about intimate partner abuse – while touching on topics which certainly relates to it. Read the rest of this entry »

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