Because Christianity is bigger than Biblical manhood or Biblical womanhood (Blog of Retha Faurie)

Myth: “God calling Adam, ‘where are you?’ is evidence for male headship”

God named both the male and female Adam (human), when they were created.

Gen 5:2 Male and female created he them; and blessed them, and called their name Adam, in the day when they were created.

With both the male and female called “Adam”, God called out to Adam, “where are you?”

Gen 3:9 And the LORD God called unto Adam, and said unto him, Where art thou?

Adam was what God called them both. God was not necessarily calling out to only the male Adam and not the female Adam. Adam is the Hebrew word meaning human. You may say that the English contain the words “said unto him”, not “said unto them/ her” but that is a matter of translation choice, not a conclusion you had to reach from the Hebrew text.

Even if God did call only the man – which we cannot know – it is not evidence of male headship, but perhaps of something like Eve coming out of hiding to face God herself while Adam stayed hidden; or God seeing worse motives of Adam’s heart; or any other reason we could or could not imagine. Getting male headship out of this text is putting the things you want to see into scripture, it is not in the words. It is presumptious to speak as if you know God’s motives for asking where the man is.

After sin came into the world, Adam gave Eve another name, Eve. And over the centuries, the church developed the habit of calling only the male by God’s given name, “Adam.” The first woman is, in human convention, called Eve, but that was not God’s name for her.

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Comments on: "Myth: “God calling Adam, ‘where are you?’ is evidence for male headship”" (6)

  1. In actuality the name meant human. It was the name of a species,like ‘cat’, not a personal given name such as we have today. So God was really calling out ‘Human’. In the Hebrew it says that God was calling out to ‘the human’. However, because before that sentence it says that “the human and his wife hid themselves” some believe that God would have said the same thing, “the human and his wife”. But we forget that this narration was written by Moses. But also, it says God “called out to ‘the human’ (Adam) and said ‘to him’ – also narrated by Moses. So, the only words by God were: “Where are you.” And I cannot tell if that is in plural or not.

    So, in the end, we really IMO cannot make a strong enough case either way to say whether God was only addressing the man or even if He were only addressing the man, why. It could have been because the man was supposed to be the protector of the garden, or because the man was the one created first with more information on the creation of the animals and should have known about the serpent and about Satan. But it certainly had nothing to do with making the man to be leader or superior to the woman, simply because such an important development would have been noted by God. We cannot just assume such things.

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  2. Anonymous said:

    I have many times heard the interpretation of this as supporting the view that Adam is the head of the household, and is held accountable for the spiritual state of the family. I wonder where the evidence is for that. Does anybody know how that argument goes?

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    • The name of this doctrine is “federal headship.” You might try Googling that term. But I think it’s a view of things that isn’t supported very well by the texts themselves.

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  3. The man and woman are ment to be as one. As God is one in three defined persons. The Christ is the Word or voice of God. The Holy Spirit is the essence of God and all His omniscient etc…. We comprehend God is not human yet as He is the Head of everything so is the punishment the fault of the man and then the woman, after that the posesed serpent was punished as well. United the marriage stands as one. 100% each. Divided it falls as the secular world laughs at believers and dance dances on their misery with glee. Respectfully- just adding my 2cents.

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  4. I like .

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